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Dan’s Silverleaf

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Name:
Dan’s Silverleaf
Address:
103 Industrial Street, Denton, TX, 76201, United States

Upcoming Events At This Venue

September 24, 2014

Smoky_Mtn_Press_V1

 

When: Wednesday, September 24
WhereDan’s Silverleaf
Times: Doors: 7:00 pm | Show: 8:00 pm
Tickets: Advanced: $10* | Day of: $13 | All-Ages

*$5 Ticket with proof of Index Fest purchase. Email info@spune.com with Index ticket receipt to receive promo code.

CAROLINE ROSE 

Sometimes epic failures produce epic results. With the release of her new album I Will Not Be Afraid, keen-eyed young singer-songwriter Caroline Rose has broken her long string of short-circuits with a live-wire national debut that draws on her roots in rockabilly, vintage country and blues to capture her unique and personal vision.

Hoping to escape the dead ends that befell her hometown, colloquially dubbed a stop on “heroin highway”, Rose found her way out via a full ride to a small liberal arts college, where she failed as a scholar, barely scraping by to graduation. Next came a stint as a failed hippie, working on and leaving an organic farm. She then bought a vintage sports car to travel the country, but it quickly broke down. On the plus side, Rose got a job at a cider distillery, where she got to taste apple brandy and applejack all day…Followed by a stint stocking shelves and sweeping floors at a grocery store for a boss who eventually fired her.

“That was the last straw,” Rose recounts. “I don’t like most bosses and most bosses don’t like me. I don’t like most professors and most professors don’t like me. So here I am. I’ve made my own way on my own terms and it’s destiny knocking on my door. BAM!”

She describes the 11 songs on I Will Not Be Afraid as “postcards I’ve picked up from along the road,” and she means that literally. Rose is in perpetual motion. She tours and lives in her van, traveling the highways and back roads to fuel her creative spirit.

Rose’s wanderlust has taken the 24-year-old from her birthplace in a not-so-idyllic small Northeastern town to every corner of the nation, where she’s made friendships, heard stories and had experiences that she’s fashioned into songs like “America Religious,” which uses a driving snare drum with brushes and psychedelic folk fiddle to underpin the cool waterfall of her peaches and molasses voice as she sings about the open skies and the storm clouds inside the American heart. And in her own.

The themes of some of Rose’s songs are drawn from the familiar. “Blood On Your Bootheels,” which opens I Will Not Be Afraid with her prickly guitar and crazy-carnival organ, was inspired by the Trayvon Martin slaying and Rose’s own passionate reaction to violence and intolerance. “Everyone seems to have their opinions about how to live free in this country, especially when it comes to young men and even more especially when it comes to young black men like Trayvon,” Rose observes. Injustice and hardship also underline “Tightrope Walker,” a song inspired by a friend’s stories about working in the school system of an impoverished Mississippi town.

But other songs literally haunt her dreams. The gorgeous textural arrangement and lyrics of “When You Go” — which evoke the openness of both the Southwest and of the future in Rose’s and co-producer Jer Coons’ shimmering guitars and her strong, defiant vocal performance — tumbled out during a night’s rest. “Sometimes songs come to me while I’m asleep and they wake me up, and that’s the best time for me to write,” Rose relates. “When I wake up my mind is like a clear glass of water. I can see everything and capture it.” That’s especially apt for the stream of consciousness lyrics that bring many of her numbers to life.

Rose’s own life seems more akin to Jack Kerouac’s On the Road. Growing up in a coastal town, her parents — who were visual artists with a love for travel — gave Rose a restless, creative spirit. And like many working class seaside locales, her hometown suffers epidemic heroin abuse.

“I saw a lot of my friends get consumed by it, but I was one of the people that got out,” Rose says. “I worked my ass off to go to college and that really was my only plan of escape at that point. I think I was in denial about being an artist.”

For two of those years Rose worked on the aforementioned farm, hoping the experience would provide her with balance and direction. “I liked the work, but I’m too city to be country and too country to be city,” she offers. “So I moved on.” When Rose worked at a cider distillery, she slept in the barn loft where she recorded many of the demos for I Will Not Be Afraid with her acoustic guitar.

“I finally accepted the idea that writing, singing and playing songs is the only thing I’ve ever really been good at,” Rose relates, “so I decided to forget about everything else and live in my car, and I hit the road.”

Rose joined a new generation of touring songwriters who blend tradition, innovation and edginess, like Hayes Carll, whom she opened for in 2014 and bandmember Jer Coons, whom Rose shared a bill with one night and discovered to be a kindred spirit. Rose produced I Will Not Be Afraid with co-production by Coons at his Burlington, Vermont studio, where they also made Rose’s 2013 self-released America Religious, playing all the guitars, keyboards, harmonica, mandolin, drums and percussion themselves.

Rose explains that the title track is her mantra. “So many people are held back by fear,” she says. “They wish they could do something else with their lives, and they just can’t take the first step. I grew up questioning everything and learned that I needed to be on my own. I needed freedom and I needed to create on my own terms and to keep moving forward without fear, wherever I go.

“I also came to understand that I don’t have any choice,” she continues. “Music is what keeps me breathing. I can’t do anything else.”

CHARLIE SHAFTER 

Sometimes you encounter a musical artist for a first time and find yourself experiencing a warm sense of déjà vu – not a feeling that you’ve heard it all before, but a feeling that you’ve reunited with a person you’ve known for ages, someone with whom you share a connection. That’s the vibe conjured up by Charlie Shafter, a young singer-songwriter with an old soul – and a knack for forging a connection with just about anyone who crosses paths with his songs.

On his self-titled debut album, the 26-year-old Shafter weaves ten richly-toned tales that recall iconic writers such as Townes Van Zandt and Elliott Smith, songs that range into acoustic blues and the grittier side of country-rock on a panoramic trek through blue-highway Americana. Shafter doesn’t write songs that grab you by the lapel and shake you into listening; they’re more likely to throw an arm around you and whisper their way into your consciousness.

“I don’t remember a time when I didn’t want to be a songwriter,” he says. “When I was a little kid, I’d listen to my parents’ records and they were mostly singer-songwriter type things. Those really made me appreciate what a good song was all about and made me want to do that – to write songs people would really be moved by.”

He succeeds in a big way on his debut. Buoyed by his affably gritty vocals and his warm, enveloping guitar tone, songs like “Sea Wall” and “Actor” wash over the listener, leaving a strong, sensual imprint long after their last notes resound. He takes a more direct approach on other tracks, like the gently finger-picked “Drunk on Desire” – which underscores the song’s hopeful plea for love – and a little bit of lustfulness on the side – with its playful melody.

On the other end of the sonic spectrum, “Dog on a Chain”(co-written with Ray Wylie Hubbard, who also lent his production talents to the project) finds Shafter mining the deeper end of both his vocal and emotive range in order to drive home the dark tones of the slide-and-organ laced bluesiness. That tune, a travelogue of cultural touchstones and sonic landmarks, finds him weaving down the dirt roads of memory, creating a picture that’s at once vivid and surreal.

“I hardly ever write an entire song about one thing,” he says. “I know what it all means, but when you look at it, it’s more like a collage than a picture. I can be writing a love song, but then throw in something that’s actually about my grandfather. I guess I like to let people fill in the blanks themselves – sometimes I can’t even do that for a couple years after I write a song.”

Shafter has had some time to fill in those blanks. While he’s lived in Texas for several years, Shafter actually cut his musical teeth in his home state of Illinois, first in cover bands specializing in standard fare like Nirvana and Pearl Jam, then gradually pushing the envelope by exploring the corners of his record collection – artists like Leon Russell and Tom Waits (both of which can be heard lurking in the corners of Shafter’s own compositions). He also came to appreciate the sounds of the Lone Star State – particularly smart, hard-scrabble artists like Hubbard, who’s emerged as something of a mentor.

Date: September 24, 2014 8:00 pm

October 7, 2014

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When: Tuesday, October 7
Where: Dan’s Silverleaf
Times: Doors: 8:00 pm | Show: 9:00 pm
Tickets: Advanced: $10 | Day of: $13 | All-Ages

For Fans of: Cloud Nothings | No Age | Japandroids

CYMBALS EAT GUITARS 
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“Wanna wake up wanting to listen to records / But those old feelings elude me / I raise a toast to the rock n’ roll ghost,” sings Cymbals Eat Guitars frontman Joseph D’Agostino on the hyper-adrenalized “XR,” which sounds like a Tonight’s the Nightouttake recorded at triple speed, with its braying harmonica and spitfire vocal delivery. It’s the track that perhaps best captures the spirit of the band’s third LP, LOSE, one of coping with abject loss and grief by rediscovering what you’ve always loved, as difficult as it may be—the redemptive power of music. For D’Agostino, this entailed coming to terms with his best friend and musical collaborator Benjamin High, who passed away suddenly seven years ago, just as Cymbals Eat Guitars began recording in earnest.

LOSE is a very apropos title because it refers not only to losing Ben, but also it’s about a sort of nostalgia, a longing for a time when music meant everything to you and your friends, and it seemed like one great rock record could change everyone’s life the way it changed yours,” says D’Agostino. “It’s about being in mourning for your long-held belief that music could literally change the world. That’s the contradiction at the heart ofLOSE… You’re disillusioned, but somehow you can do nothing else but rail against that feeling mightily and try, once again, to make a record that makes you and everyone else ‘wake up wanting to listen to records’.”

And indeed, the band, rounded out by bassist Matthew Whipple, keyboardist Brian Hamilton, and drummer Andrew Dole, alongside producer John Agnello, do little wallowing. This is a raucous affair, an Irish Wake, ultimately rooted in nothing less than a celebration of just being alive.

SLOTHRUST 
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“…slings pleasingly distorted guitars accompanied by thoughtful lyrics.” – THE NEW YORKER

“Paired with powerful heft similar to Nirvana but winsomely matched with Weezer’s anxiety, “Crockpot” is for nostalgists as well as intellectuals.” – IMPOSE MAGAZINE

“If I had to compare Slothrust to other bands, I’d say that I don’t have to do that.” – OH MY ROCKNESS

“They take the Pixies loud/quiet/loud template and push it to extremes, with the songs tending to veer violently between passages of sweet pop and coruscating Nirvana-esque riffing… a kind of midpoint between grunge and thoughtful indie rock, deftly skirting the two genres with unpatronising intelligence and sharp-eyed individualism” – NORMAN RECORDS

“Lead singer Leah Wellbaum has a made-for-mosh-pit-shout-along voice, and the lyrics provide nonstop ins for the socially awkward and alienated to commiserate… A perfect reminder of the power grunge music has to reach common ground glossier genres wouldn’t be caught dead in. But who ever needed gloss?” – BITCH MAGAZINE

“Their unique blend of grunge, punk, blues, and jazz has just been that perfect blend of styles I didn’t even know I needed, but I am quite thankful I found it.” – THE REVUE (CANADA)

DOME DWELLERS
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“Dome Dwellers deal in herbal-scented pop music that sounds not unlike Kings of Leon covering the flaming lips in a kettle, surrounded by a plethora of mind-expanding drugs — Swerving wildly between the twin beaks of psychedelic pop and out-and-out stoner aggression, [Lie Down] it’s one of those tracks that can’t help to bring to mind the freak-show spazz outs of Sonic Youth at their peak. — ‘Say it ain’t so’ should be piped in to prisons across the world in order to reduce inmate violence with its charming guitars sounding like a psychedelic representation of Fugazi unplugged, if you can imagine such a thing. With Cullen Dean’s bass playing an important role underpinning Michael J Slack’s flights of art-rock fancy and David Gore apparently imagining he’s in a jazz band, the music takes all manner of unexpected deviations and it’s a simple pleasure to try to anticipate what the band will do next. —They’re the sort of band you’ll want to play to your friends and the sort of band that will (and deserve to) inspire a loyal following that will undoubtedly cross oceans to see them play live. — ‘Maybe I should have some pride’ is a great record that’ll leave you with a huge smile on your face – gloriously, wonderfully unique, it has no immediate peers and it’s simply a joyous experience from its atypical start to its distortion-laden conclusion.” – Sonic Abuse (United Kingdom)

Date: October 7, 2014 8:00 pm